Marivonne R. Essex, "The Red Headed Lawyer"
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Posted October 2nd, 2017 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

Transcription below: I’m Marivonne Essex and I’m the Red Headed Lawyer and I want to talk to you today about some common misconceptions that I see people speak to me about when they come in to talk about situations, legal situations with their family, with divorces, with child custody, that kind of thing. The most

Posted September 22nd, 2015 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

Divorce isn’t easy. Typically, it’s a long, emotional and drawn out time in your life that you never imagined would be a part of your story. While we all agree that getting a divorce isn’t easy – there are several ways that we can make the divorce process easier. Communicate with your Ex Sounds crazy,

Posted May 22nd, 2013 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

Sometimes in the aftermath of a divorce, spouses can get so caught up in their own quarrel that they don’t realize what chaotic situation they are putting their children in. After all, hearing both parents constantly degrade one another is sure to impact the child’s views on both parents. For children, they can sometimes get

Posted May 3rd, 2013 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

No matter how much you and the other parent try to resolve disputes in a mature fashion, it is a good possibility that the two of you aren’t going to completely agree on everything. It is imperative that these disagreements are handled in a productive fashion. Ideally, these matters can be resolved without the direct

Posted March 20th, 2013 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

“Alienation” is becoming a frequent topic for family law attorneys. If you are not familiar with the term (as applied to family law), the best way to describe it is brainwashing. One parent “alienates” the child from the other parent by repeatedly and deliberately telling the child “bad” things about the absent parent. Telling the

Posted February 8th, 2013 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

First, it is important to understand that a judge in Texas deciding divorce issues is a state court judge. A claim for the dependency exemption for a child for federal income tax purposes is a federal issue. Federal trumps state, so the divorce judge cannot decide who gets the dependency exemption. The parents, however, can