Marivonne R. Essex, "The Red Headed Lawyer"
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Posted September 22nd, 2015 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

Divorce isn’t easy. Typically, it’s a long, emotional and drawn out time in your life that you never imagined would be a part of your story. While we all agree that getting a divorce isn’t easy – there are several ways that we can make the divorce process easier. Communicate with your Ex Sounds crazy,

Posted August 10th, 2015 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

Recently I read an article entitled “Personality Disorders in Divorce” by Jim Dolan. That got your attention, didn’t it? I can hear a lot of you saying, “I know my ex has one of those! He (she) is crazy! Let me just tell you….” As a divorce attorney, I see people on both sides of

Posted July 29th, 2015 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

An overview of how marriage and divorce works in Texas, taken from the Houston Bar Assocation Family Law Handbook. Marriage and Divorce Does Texas have an age requirement for marriage? Yes. Both parties must be at least 18 years old to obtain a marriage license. If either party is under 18 years of age, parental

Posted April 30th, 2015 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

In most divorce cases, the marital home is the largest jointly owned asset and is subject to division per the Texas community property laws. Unlike other community property states, Texas judges are not required to divide property settlements in a straight 50-50 ratio. Instead, assets can be divided in a “just and right fashion,” which

Posted October 10th, 2014 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

There are many common myths concerning divorce in the state of Texas, which include: If I get the kids 50 percent of the time, I won’t have to pay child support. Texas has a no-fault divorce system, so my affair is irrelevant. Texas doesn’t have alimony. I bought it with my earnings, so it’s mine.

Posted August 22nd, 2014 | by The Red Headed Lawyer

Standard injunctions routinely imposed in family cases in Texas can cause our clients to violate ‘The Brady Bill’, 18 U.S.CA § 922(g). The mutual injunctions routinely used in divorce cases in Texas include standard language prohibiting the use or threatened use of violence by one party to the divorce case against the other party. Therefore,